Featured Courses: Behavioral Health

Network of Care eLearning delivers a comprehensive roster of classes public sector employees need to stay up to date. We make it convenient to learn the latest techniques, maintain your certification and credentials, and increase your earning power. Course delivery is simple, assessment is immediate, and certification is tracked automatically.

ADHD is one of the most common psychiatric disorders of childhood and adolescence. This course provides relevant information on diagnosis and treatment.
The hyperactivity and impulsivity experienced by children who are diagnosed with ADHD can pose challenges for families, teachers, and mental health counselors. The authors present an integrative model of Adlerian play therapy and adventure-based counseling (ABC) that extends beyond traditional talk therapy, fosters a strength-based perspective, and is action-oriented and dynamic. Specific ABC treatment activities for working with children and families affected by ADHD are presented in the context of the four phases of treatment in Adlerian play therapy.
Dr. Howard Liddle, a nationally recognized family psychologist and Director of the University of Miami Center for Treatment Research on Adolescent Substance Abuse, discusses recent developments in adolescent substance abuse treatment. Topics include evidence-based treatments, trends in adolescent drug use, how to establish a therapeutic alliance with a teenager, and protecting teens from alcohol and drug use. Dr. Liddle uses a case example to address risk factors, therapeutic windows of opportunity, and ways to engage the adolescent.
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause irreparable harm to individuals and have profound effects on families and communities. In addition to the physical and neurological effects, brain injury creates an intense boundary experience that forces clients to confront the existential givens of freedom, death, isolation, and meaninglessness. This program provides an overview of TBI and its existential implications for clients, emphasizing interventions and clinical considerations for mental health counselors working with clients who have experienced TBI.
This guide helps therapists and other health care professionals identify and treat individuals (or families) who currently are experiencing alcohol problems. The guide includes screening and assessment tools, brief intervention strategies, and treatment alternatives for longer term care.
The treatment of anger in people exposed to trauma presents special challenges to therapists. This program discusses the importance of anger in trauma therapy, treatment resistance, precautions for personal safety, the stress inoculation approach to anger treatment, how to avoid hindering the client's ability to express or resolve anger, and recommendations on the use of countertransference to lessen hostilities between the patient and therapist
This course discusses the types of anxiety disorders, prevalence, etiology, risk factors, and treatment in adults and children.
This program reviews risk factors for childhood suicide and suicidal behavior, provides a commentary on current methods of assessing suicide risk in children, and discusses guidelines for conducting developmentally appropriate risk assessments with children and suggestions for consulting with caregivers.
This course discusses treatment issues related to body dysmorphic disorder and describes the application of narrative therapy to work with individuals diagnosed with this disorder. A case example is included.
This publication is the latest edition of the previously published manual entitled, Psychotherapeutic Medications: What Every Counselor Should Know. Patients who are in combined treatment often see a pharmacotherapist for their medication therapy and a psychotherapist for their talk therapy. This material provides a quick "desk reference" on psychotherapeutic medications for substance abuse and mental health treatment providers. The following topics are included for each medication type: Generic name/Brand name; Purpose of the medication; Usual dose, frequency, and side effects; Potential side effects; Potential for abuse or dependence; Emergency Conditions; Cautions; Special Considerations for Pregnant Women.
Mourning is the term for the culturally-informed practices through which grief is expressed. Although grief is a universal human experience, mourning varies greatly by culture and ethnic group. This material examines bereavement and mourning in African American and Latino/a American groups, discusses broader cultural issues related to assessment and intervention, and suggests questions for health providers to ask that show respect for a family’s cultural heritage.
Bipolar disorder is a complex disability that presents substantial challenges for diagnosis and treatment. A growing body of literature indicates that psychotherapeutic interventions benefit bipolar clients and have the potential to significantly improve their psychosocial functioning and decrease the substantial social costs of the illness. This program examines psychoeducational interventions along with three evidence-based interventions that address the complexity of bipolar disorder.
This program examines behavioral and cognitive therapies and focuses specifically on the cognitive-behavioral model. The material discusses how to help clients recognize situations in which they are likely to use, find ways of avoiding those situations, and cope more effectively with situations, feelings, and behaviors related to their substance abuse.
Brief interventions and therapies, including solution-focused brief therapy, have become increasingly important modalities in the treatment of substance abuse. This program provides a discussion of the general theories that provide the basis for strategic / interactional therapies, information on when to use brief therapy with substance abuse clients, and a case study using strategic / interactional approaches with a substance-abusing client.
Topics include theoretical concepts of brief strategic family therapy, creating therapeutic relationships with families, diagnosing family system problems, orchestrating change, and how to engage resistant families.
Case managers are often called upon to confront difficult issues when working with clients, collaterals, and colleagues. The author provides tools to help the case manager explore differences and resolve possible conflicts, and she also offers strategies for disarming and managing anger.
This course provides (a) a description of custody-related mental health evaluations, (b) ethical considerations involved in the evaluation process, (c) recommendations for conducting mental health evaluations, and (d) a format for the written report.
This course discusses normal and abnormal childhood sexual behaviors and examines factors that therapists should be aware of as contributing to children’s problematic sexual attitudes and behavior.
The authors discuss biopsychosocial factors related to chronic pain as a necessary foundation for understanding and helping clients who are in pain. They review familiar evidence-based counseling approaches including assessment considerations, use of psychotropic medications, cognitive-behavioral strategies, hypnosis and imagery techniques, family considerations, and positive psychology.
This course gives an overview of personality disorders and provides a more detailed discussion of borderline, antisocial, narcissistic, and passive-aggressive personality disorders. Topics include diagnostic criteria, assessment, engagement, crisis stabilization, treatment, continuum of care, and alcohol and drug use among people with personality disorders.
The purpose of this article is to update counselors on the expansion of bipolar disorder in the psychiatric literature, present evidence for the validity of borderline personality disorder, discuss strategies for the differential diagnosis of it from bipolar disorder, review proposed changes in DSM-V, and integrate the literature into a mental health counseling framework.
This program provides information about how to assess for intimate partner violence, explores safety-related ethical issues that arise when counseling clients in IPV relationships, and explains the use of safety plans as a tool for promoting the safety of clients in IPV relationships. The material includes additional information on safety planning.
Mental health professionals and other health care providers regularly counsel clients who are in intimate relationships with partners who are violent. Topics include understanding the dynamics of abuse, screening, assessment, and intervention strategies, barriers to leaving an abusive relationship, cultural issues, and safety planning.
In counseling sessions, clients often present dreams as material to use in making meaning of their experiences. This course provides a brief review of historical perspectives on dreams and dream interpretation and provides a foundation for examining dreams as an integral part of counseling practice.
In case management and child welfare practice, successful intervention and treatment depend heavily on the quality of the caseworker's relationship with the children and family. This program describes core elements of the helping relationship, provides techniques for building rapport, and includes strategies for engaging children and families in the work that needs to be accomplished.
This course discusses five principles of ethical decision-making in mental health practice and provides a step-by-step model for resolving ethical dilemmas. The course also explores specific ethical and legal issues as they relate to substance abuse treatment and the treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS. Topics include duty to treat, duty to warn, dual relationships, confidentiality, and end-of-life issues.
The authors discuss both the positive use of electronic communication and the need to address fundamental counseling issues that arise in using it. The article examines the AMHCA and ACA ethical codes for the use of technology in the counseling relationship.
A practitioners' use of digital technology has become enormously complex. Therapists are confronted with what to do about managing their online presence whether or not they are actively using social media. In addition, therapists face challenges in managing confidentiality and privacy issues, personal disclosure, dual relationships, and documentation of electronic contact, as well as multiple issues related to clinicians' use of the Internet, email, or texting to provide therapy. Our speaker addresses some of the ethical and legal ramifications of these challenges.This CE course is designated as intermediate.
Making the best ethical decisions can be challenging given the multitude of complex ethical situations that arise in practice. This program examines the ethical values that ten master therapists draw upon in their work.
The author discusses the extent and nature of client gift-giving in counseling, ethical and therapeutic issues, a scheme for categorizing and assessing gift-giving behavior, and general suggestions for handling these incidents.
The wraparound process is a collaborative, team-based approach to service and support planning. This program gives a brief history of the development of the wraparound process and describes ten principles that guide wraparound services for children, youth, and families. Source: National Wraparound Initiative
The author describes children’s developmental stages and age-appropriate interviewing techniques that can be used in child custody evaluations. These strategies can also be used by child welfare workers when assessing a child’s safety and well-being.
This course provides a brief history of case management and discusses case management functions, principles, competencies, and models.
Because of the adverse effects of PTSD on relationships, couples therapy can be a powerful adjunct treatment; however, few receive this service. A new framework for conceptualizing couples therapy organizes treatment around the 3 PTSD symptom clusters (re-experiencing, avoidance, and arousal). The authors summarize the relationship consequences of each symptom cluster and provide specific treatment interventions and a case study as an illustration.
This program describes the task-based approach to life-threatening illness, anticipatory grief, the stages of grief, and general aspects of grief therapy. The course also includes sections on children and grief and cross-cultural responses to grief and mourning.
This program describes the process of moving an individual from assessment and diagnosis into treatment intervention. The course offers techniques for motivational interviewing and provides empirical support for various types of substance abuse treatment interventions.
This course is designed to address the problem of marijuana use by adolescents. The program provides instruction on how to conduct a brief, five-session treatment intervention for teens with cannabis use disorders in an outpatient setting.
The material provides five basic principles of motivational interviewing that address ambivalence and facilitate the change process. The course offers opening strategies to use with clients in the early stages of treatment and concludes with a summary of research on the effectiveness of motivational interviewing.
This program discusses the influence of culture in the delivery of health and human services. Participants will be able to identify the components of cultural competency and will learn techniques for working effectively across cultures. Topics include practice in a multi-cultural environment, elements of cultural competence, diversity and ethics, delivery of services to various ethnic groups, structural racism, influence of culture on the family, interviewing techniques, decision-making models that foster inclusion, applying cultural knowledge to practice, understanding personal biases, and handling intolerance.
This program discusses the meaning of cultural values and treatment issues, including the neglected dimension of the cultural background of the therapist. The course illustrates the application of the multidimensional cultural approach in the case of a rebellious Mexican-American teenager.
The authors discuss motivational interviewing and the transtheoretical model of change as a conceptual framework for counseling clients who engage in non-suicidal self-injurious behaviors. The major principles of motivational interviewing are applied in a case study of a client who self-injures.
Topics include the efficacy of exposure therapy in the treatment of PTSD, common myths associated with the use of exposure therapy, overview of clinical guidelines for exposure treatment, and helping patients "re-author" their view of the trauma and develop coping skills to manage PTSD and co-morbid symptoms.
This course provides practitioners with essential information on how to reduce the potential for becoming the subject of a malpractice lawsuit or licensing board complaint. Topics include meeting the standard of care, record keeping, confidentiality, office policies, and boundary violations.
Bryant Welch, JD, PhD, answers questions about risk management and how practitioners can protect themselves from professional liability exposure. The course also provides information on the elements of a suicide risk assessment.
Schizophrenia, one of the most serious and chronic mental illnesses, often begins in adolescence. It affects every aspect of individual and family functioning. The authors discuss a treatment model that includes establishment of a collaborative relationship between therapist and family, the provision of information and support, and the creation of highly structured environments in the treatment setting and in the home.
Many adults complain of poor sleep yet engage in behaviors that are counterproductive to sleep. This article reviews recent research on the treatment of insomnia and discusses application of mental health counseling strategies for treatment. Case studies illustrate the application of current research within counselor areas of expertise in cognitive behavioral therapy and behavioral counseling.
Suicide assessment, prevention, and intervention is a topic relevant to all health care providers. This course discusses the elements of assessment, risk and protective factors, appropriate care settings, safety planning, treatment, and follow-up.This CE program is designated as beginning to intermediate.
Suicidal clients are a difficult and challenging population in counseling. This article contains 25 practical, hands-on strategies for counselors to assist in their interactions with suicidal clients. The strategies are situated within a seven-step model for crisis intervention that is specifically tailored to suicidal clients.
This course outlines principles of clinical supervision and guidelines for supervisors, addresses such issues as cultural competence, ethical and legal issues, and documentation, and provides information on various methods of monitoring and observing clinical performance. The material is relevant for both supervisors and supervisees. Vignettes are included to illustrate various clinical supervision scenarios.
This program presents detailed descriptions of the teacher, counselor, and consultant roles of supervisors. Psychotherapy-driven supervision is illustrated for three theoretical approaches: humanistic-relationship oriented, cognitive-behavioral, and solution-focused.
This manual is designed for mental health practitioners who want to establish a solid foundation of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) skills. The manual details the basic steps needed to provide cognitive behavioral therapy with the intent that the therapist will feel increasingly comfortable using CBT. The manual is not designed for advanced CBT practitioners.
Shame co-occurs with many disorders and client concerns, such as self-harm, depression, anxiety, eating disorders, interpersonal conflicts, self-criticism, trauma, and personality disorders. The authors review the complexity of shame and present a rationale for using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) to treat it. The article presents primary ACT techniques and a case study.
Transgenerational trauma is defined as trauma that has been passed down from one generation to another, either directly or indirectly. The authors review the literature on child sexual abuse (CSA), the influence of primary caregivers and transgenerational trauma, and present a case illustration. Specific interventions are offered to provide mental health counselors with innovative tools for ameliorating the effects of transgenerational trauma with this client population.
Trauma, substance abuse, and mental health interact in a variety of ways. This course discusses the impact of trauma on individuals and communities and identifies common mental health and substance use disorders associated with trauma. The material includes screening and assessment tools and strategies to addresses clinical issues important in treating those affected by trauma. This CE program is designated as beginning to intermediate.
Suicide in the military is a significant concern. The authors review empirical studies and use two case studies to illustrate the potential explanatory role of Joiner's (2005) interpersonal-psychological theory of suicidal behavior: The theory posits that three variables--perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness, and acquired capability for suicide--determine the risk of an individual engaging in a lethal suicide attempt. The case studies provide a framework within which to understand the phenomenon of suicide in the military and illustrate how the three variables might be affected in an active duty population post-deployment.
This program explores the use of mindfulness interventions in trauma counseling, with particular attention on how mindfulness can address the neuropsychological aspects of trauma. The material includes a case example that illustrates the use of mindfulness techniques in trauma counseling.
 
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